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raqqa

“What we do not yet know is how much of the ancient Abbasid city of Raqqa and its horseshoe walls and the gate of Baghdad built probably in the eighth century, survives. So much of Syria’s antiquity has been damaged or destroyed – sometimes quite deliberately – in this war, that few historians bother any more to decry the destruction of the country’s cultural heritage.” — from a recent Robert Fisk article

The deliberate destruction of select Middle Eastern cultural heritage goes right along with the slow motion genocide that’s in gear right now in Puerto Rico. For resources, in the name of Full Spectrum Dominance.

Some academics will be prone to argue about my use of the word genocide, but such interaction is almost always engaged in in lieu of doing something about the horrid momentum I’m touching upon here. The fear related to losing personal intellectual ground is too often greater than the fear of what’s tearing apart the Collective Good.

What good is being semantically correct if designed death through discombobulation rules the day? That is the way things have been going for quite some time now. Young people, generally, can’t see the horrid momentum we’re all supporting, and older folks, generally, don’t want to see it.

And that’s why it’s necessary to secure significant reins of decision-making power, and significant means for helping others to self-educate and act in their own interests.

Educational institutions which routinely insert history classes into their curricula which inform students about the legacies of Mesopotamia, for instance, pay virtually zero attention to the current events which are destroying that inheritance and immiserating millions each and every school day. Murdering many in the process. Again, by design.

They are engaged in acclimating one and all to… our exceptional culture.

I do not agree — to put it mildly — with the advocacy of violence that is the fundamental thrust of what Sayyid Qutb was so much about at the end of his life. Nor do I relate whatsoever to his take on American jazz… to insert a light note here midst my ultra-serious bottom line point.

But the ISIS attitude toward U.S. materialism, generally, is spot on., isn’t it?

One does not have to embrace Sharia law to acknowledge that we’re driving ourselves over the precipice with our way of life. Nor do educators have to remain ignorant about how our self-centered sense of American Exceptionalism is fueled by the very mainstream media outlets which they praise in classrooms, and use as a point of departure for homework and discussion.

Robert Fisk closes his article with a spotlight on select “American claims.” Well, American claims on many scores —  compounding ignorance with ignorance, and contributing to our collective demise — need to be addressed anew by administrators, teachers, school staff, students, their loved ones, one and all. Everyone.

But that’s impossible to do as long as no time is taken out to engage in leisurely discussion about HOW to radically transform education coast to coast and beyond. Beyond the borders of America — and within its own opioid-ruled realm — we are imposing American jazz that’s designed to end the world. All enabled by the educational dynamic I’ve highlighted here.

Once again, I ask readers to contact me to do something about the above. To rise above simply documenting, discussing, debating, demonstrating and diverting ourselves to death.

Please note that I’m quite open to hearing from readers about where in the U.S. educators are engaged in addressing our collective crises sufficiently well. I know of none.

Rachel Oxman can be reached at aptosnews@gmail.com.

One Comment

  1. K SHESHU BABU says:

    The US educational system has very little realistic history in the curricula. It dlll stinn