There are no breaking news at the moment

nuclearwar

“Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic, and it’s very important to know who’s running the show.” — Arthur C. Clarke

In 1942, when I was born, Walt Disney came out with the “Sorcerer’s Apprentice” (featuring the famous mouse, Mickey). Disney was inspired by the work of nineteenth-century French Composer Paul Dukas, a piece of music written in the same year that the New York Times began to use the hilarious slogan “All the News That’s Fit to Print.” That’s a funny mantra to repeat about any mainstream media outlet, of course.

Contrary to popular opinion in certain academic circles, the roots of the story can be traced to Lucian (120-180 AD), a Greek poet writing during the time of the Roman Empire, not Ovid. In Lucian’s “The Teller of Lies,” a young man served as an apprentice to a magician, and every night the man with the magical powers would put a spell on a pestle. The spell animated that piece of wood (ordinarily used to simply pound grain into flour. The spell made it possible for the pestle to go downstairs and secure a couple of buckets of water… to make life easier for the apprentice and the magician.

A second spell guaranteed that the pestle would return to being just another pestle. But one night, when the magician was not around, the apprentice tried to duplicate the trick. He had no problem getting the pestle into gear to provide the expected service. But once the pestle had brought enough water, the apprentice was unable to duplicate the spell that would terminate the pestle’s action. In a panic, he picked up a sword and sliced the pestle in two, but that led to two walking pestles bringing more and more water.

The magician eventually returned and kept matters from getting too out of hand.

This year my school, where I will be teaching an age group that tends to eat up Disney fare, there will be a spotlight on Mythology, Magic and Mystery; that’ll be the theme from fall through the spring. I plan to make instructive hay out of the way in which we — today — say that Technology rules, the manner in which we embrace its products, treating each Silicon Valley gadget as if its magical and desirable, even necessary. You can do the same, as parent, teacher or simply a concerned citizen. Young students too.

We are in the midst of unleashing forces which are slated to make life on earth not worth living. Courtesy of Silicon Valley technology. Our Grand Center for Shortcuts and Power.

This morning I saw some video footage of Dr. Robert M. Levin trying to reassure citizens that there’s nothing to worry about with regard to a nuclear explosion going off near one’s home. If it weren’t so sickeningly misleading for the Collective Good, I’d make some cavalier remark about the false information mainstream media outlets distribute daily, and how this is more of the same.

But it is not the same. For this is a transparent repeat of the Duck and Cover 50s propaganda, taken to unbelievably disgusting depths. Meaning, the bright-siding — replete with a politically correct diverse crowd of attractive actors dancing and smiling (ear to ear) to a catchy tune — is unprecedented. And utterly frightening that official circles could have put it out thinking that its unacceptable hidden agenda wouldn’t be transparent.

Authorities in Ventura Country, California can’t be allowed to get away with what they’re doing. No official spokespeople can be permitted to circulate such dangerous drivel. For far too great numbers in the U.S. are likely to buy the devious message to some degree.

I wasn’t born yesterday. But a lot of children were. And if our present horrid momentum isn’t stopped, those babies will never get to be my age.

Anywhere in the world.

Richard Martin Oxman has been an educator and activist for over half-a-century. He would be honored to speak gratis at any educational institution which makes a request at aptosnews@gmail.com.

2 Comments

  1. K SHESHU BABU says:

    New inventions are mostly viewed by common people as ‘ magic’ because of the unexpected application of the discovery. That is the ‘ magic’ of science and it’s influence on human beings

  2. Pingback: Pressenza - Note To Colleagues At My New School Focusing On The Myth Of American Innocence