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Man’s greenhouse gas (GHG) pollution goes into the one common atmosphere and one common ocean of all countries on earth. Each year the world adds 66 billion tonnes CO2-equivalent to its inescapable Carbon Debt that in dollar terms  is increasing at $13.2 trillion per year.  Trump America that threatens to withdraw from the Paris Climate Agreement has 4.4% of the world’s population but contributes a disproportionate $2.7 trillion or  20% of the world’s  annual Carbon Debt increase.

Revised annual per capita greenhouse gas (GHG) pollution for all countries (tonnes CO2-e per person per year) has been determined taking methanogenic livestock and land use into account [1, 2] .  The world average is 63.80 billion tonnes CO2-e / 7.137 billion people in 2013 = 8.9 tonnes CO2-e per person per year, this term including all greenhouse gases (GHGs) except water, notably carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrogen oxides (NO2 and N2O),  and expressed as CO2 equivalents.

If we assume that these annual per capita GHG pollution values are the same in 2016 as in 2013, then we can take 2016 population data [3] to estimate the amount of GHG pollution for the major players in 2016. If the world  still has an average  “annual per capita GHG pollution” of 8.9 tonnes CO2-equivalent per person per year (as calculated for 2013) then with a 2016 population of 7,432.7 million it has an annual GHG pollution in 2016 of 63.80 billion tonnes CO2-e x 7,433 million/ 7,137 million = 66.4 billion tonnes CO2-equivalent.

Numerous climate scientists , biologists and science-informed activists  demand that for a safe planet for all peoples and all species  the atmospheric CO2  – presently about 405 parts per million and increasing at 3 ppm CO2 per year [4] – be urgently returned to the pre-Industrial Revolution level of about 300 ppm CO2 [5, 6]. Until the late 20th century the atmospheric CO2 had not exceeded 280 ppm CO2 for about 800,000 years [7].   The present annual increase in greenhouse gas (GHG) pollution of  66.4 billion tonnes CO2-equivalent can be seen as an increase in the world’s Carbon Debt.

This Carbon Debt can also be expressed in dollar terms. Thus Dr Chris Hope of 90-Nobel-Laureate Cambridge University has estimated a damage-related Carbon Price of  US$200 per tonne of CO2-equivalent [8].  The annual Carbon Debt increase (at a damage-related Carbon Price of $200 per tonne CO2-equivalent) = 66.4 billion tonnes CO2-equivalent x $200 per tonne CO2-equivalent = $13, 280 billion = $13.28 trillion.

Whereas ordinary financial indebtedness can be addressed by default, bankruptcy or printing money, Carbon Debt is an inescapable burden on future generations e.g. if sea walls are not built, coastal cities will be inundated  [9, 10].

Below are listed revised “annual per capita greenhouse gas (GHG) pollution” estimates for all countries (tonnes CO2-e per person per year, the world average being 8.9) [1, 2], together with the damage-related per capita cost of that pollution (at $200 per tonne CO2-equivalent) [8]:

(A) countries with about 4 to 41 times the world average annual per capita GHG pollution:  

Belize (366.9; $73,380), Guyana (203.1; $40,620), Malaysia (126.0; $25,200), Papua New Guinea (114.7; $22,940), Qatar (101.8; $20,360), Zambia (97.5; $19,500), Antigua & Barbuda (85.6; $17,120), United Arab Emirates (82.4; $16,480), Panama (68.0; $13,600), Botswana (64.9; $13,629), Liberia (55.0; $11,000), Indonesia (53.6; $10,720), New Zealand (53.2; $10,640), Australia (52.9; $10,580 –  116; $23,200 if including its huge GHG-generating  exports), Nicaragua (51.2; $10,240), Canada (50.1; $10,020), Equatorial Guinea (47.5; $9,500), Venezuela (45.2; $9,040), Brazil (43.4; $8,680),  Myanmar (41.9; $8,380), Ireland (41.4; $8,280), United States (41.0; $8,200), Cambodia (40.5; $8,100), Kuwait (37.3; $7,460), Paraguay (37.2; $7,440), Central African Republic (35.7; $7,140).

(B) countries with about 2 and 4 times the world average annual per capita GHG pollution:

Peru (34.8; $6,960), Mongolia (32.2; $6,440), Singapore (31.2; $6,240), Bahrain (30.5; $6,100), Trinidad & Tobago (29.8; $5,960), Cameroon (29.5; $5,900), Congo, Democratic Republic (formerly Zaire) (29.3; $5,860), Côte d’Ivoire (29.1; $5,820), Denmark (27.8; $5,560), Brunei (27.4; $5,480), Bolivia (27.3; $5,460), Guatemala (26.9; $5,380), Belgium (26.3; $5,260), Ecuador (26.2; $5,240),  Estonia (25.4; $5,080), Laos (25.3; $5,060), Suriname (25.1; $5,020), Netherlands (24.9; $4,980), Libya (24.9; $4,980), Nepal (24.6; $4,920), Benin (24.5; $4,900), Angola (23.8; $4,760), Madagascar (23.7; $4,740), Argentina (23.7; $4,740), Uruguay (23.7; $4,740)*, Luxembourg (23.6; $4,720), Turkmenistan (23.5; $4,700), Czech Republic (23.5; $4,700), Zimbabwe (23.3; $4,660), Gabon (23.1; $4,620), Greece (21.9; $4,380), United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (21.5; $4,300), Cyprus (21.4; $4,280), Congo, Republic (21.0; $4,200), Spain (20.9; $4,180), Finland (20.6; $4,120), Israel (20.2; $4,040), Norway (20.1; $4,020), Colombia (19.8; $3,960), Namibia (19.8; $3,960), Mauritania (19.7; $3,940), South Africa (19.4; $3,880), Ukraine (19.1; $3,820), Germany (18.6; $3,720).

(C) countries with about 1 and 2 times the world average annual per capita GHG pollution:

France (17.7; $3,540), Italy (17.6; $3,520), Uzbekistan (17.5; $3,500), Costa Rica (17.1; $3,420), Sudan (16.8; $3,360), Saudi Arabia (16.6; $3,320), Slovenia (16.5; $3,300), Azerbaijan (16.4; $3,280), Russia (16.2; $3,240), Sierra Leone (16.2; $3,240), Slovakia (15.9; $3,180), Honduras (15.8; $3,160), Hungary (15.5; $3,100), Kazakhstan (15.4; $3,080), Portugal (15.0; $3,000), Sweden (15.0; $3,000), Iran (14.5; $2,900), Iceland (14.2; $2,840), Mexico (13.9; $2,780), Oman (13.8; $2,760), Malta (13.; $2,660), Austria (13.0; $2,600), Poland (12.9; $2,580), Jamaica (12.8; $2,560), Palau (12.8; $2,560), South Korea (12.7; $2,540), Guinea (12.5; $2,500), North Korea (12.1; $2,420), Bahamas (12.1; $2,420), Nigeria (11.7; $2,340), Nauru (11.7; $2,340), Malawi (11.7; $2,340), Mali (11.6; $2,320), Chad (11.6; $2,320), Taiwan (11.6; $2,320), Latvia (11.4; $2,280), Vanuatu (11.1; $2,220), Switzerland (11.0; $2,200), Romania (10.9; $2,180),  Togo (10.9; $2,180), Japan (10.7; $2,140), Serbia & Montenegro (10.4; $2.080), Seychelles (10.2; $2,040), Bulgaria (10.1; $2,020), Lebanon (9.8; $1,960), Syria (9.4; $1,880), Tanzania (9.3; $1,860), Turkey (9.2; $1,840), Barbados (9.1; $1,820), Jordan (9.1; $1,820), Occupied State of Palestine (9.1; $1,820)*, Philippines (9.0; $1,800), Guinea-Bissau (9.0; $1,800).

(D) countries with annual per capita GHG pollution at or below world average (8.9 tonnes CO2-equivalent per person per year):

Ghana (8.9; $1,780), Thailand (8.7; $1,740), Chile (8.7; $1,740), Fiji (8.7; $1,740), Belarus (8.6; $1,720), Sri Lanka (8.5; $1,700), Macedonia (8.5; $1,700), Tonga (7.4; $1,480), Croatia (7.4; $1,480), China (7.4; $1,480), Burkina Faso (7.3; $1,460), Bosnia & Herzegovina (7.2; $1,440), Kenya (7.1; $1,420), Dominican Republic (7.1; $1,420), Senegal (7.0; $1,400), Tunisia (7.0; $1,400), Algeria (6.6; $1,320), Grenada (6.4; $1,280), Samoa (6.2; $1,240), Rwanda (6.1; $1,220), El Salvador (6.0; $1,200), Lithuania (5.9; $1,180), Mozambique (5.8; $1,160), Lesotho (5.7; $1,140), Burundi (5.5; $1,100), Iraq (5.5; $1,100), Eritrea (5.3; $1,060), St Kitts & Nevis (5.1; $1,020), Uganda (5.1; $1,020), Haiti (5.0; $1,000), Mauritius (5.0; $1,000), Albania (4.3; $860), Dominica (4.2; $840), Bhutan (4.1; $820), Niger (4.1; $820), Ethiopia (4.1; $820), Moldova (4.0; $800), Georgia (4.0; $800), Yemen (3.7; $740), Tajikistan (3.7; $740), Afghanistan (3.6; $720), Swaziland (3.6; $720), Cuba (3.5; $700),   Cape Verde (3.5; $700), Kyrgyzstan (3.4; $680), The Gambia (3.0; $600), St Lucia (2.9; $580), Bangladesh (2.7; $540), Egypt (2.6; $520), Niue (2.6; $520), Pakistan (2.5; $500), Morocco (2.5; $500), Djibouti (2.4; $480), St Vincent & Grenadines (2.4; $480), Armenia (2.3; $460), Maldives (2.1; $420), India (2.1; $420), Cook Islands (2.1; $420), Vietnam (1.9; $380), São Tomé and Príncipe (1.9; $380), Comoros (1.6; $320), Solomon Islands (1.4; $280), Kiribati (1.2; $240), Tuvalu (1.2; $240)* (* indicates an estimate based on that for an immediately contiguous, ethnically-related country).

You can examine this data and ascertain how your country contributes to greenhouse gas  (GHG) pollution in an absolute and comparative sense. Thus, for the US the annual Carbon Debt of $8,200 per person x 324.1 million persons = a $2,657.6. billion. per year annual Carbon Debt increase i.e. a disproportionate 20.0% of the world’s annual total Carbon Debt increase ($13, 280 billion) due to a country with only 4.4% of the world’s’ population.

For Australia, the annual Carbon Debt of $10,580 per person x 24.3 million persons = $257.1 billion. per year annual Carbon Debt increase i.e. a disproportionate 1.9% of the world’s total due to a country with only 0.3% of the world’s’ population. However climate criminal Australia is a world leader in coal, Liquid Natural Gas (LNG) and iron ore exports. Australia’s Domestic plus Exported GHG per capita is 116.0 tonnes CO2-equivalent per person per year, this corresponding to an annual Carbon Debt increase of $23,200 per person and hence a national annual Carbon Debt increase  of $23,200 per year per person x 24.3 million persons = $563.8 billion per year i.e. 4.2% of the world’s total due to a country with only 0.3% of the world’s’ population.

By way of comparison, China with 18.6% of the world’s population produces 15.4% of the world’s annual  GHG pollution,  and India with 17.8% of the world’s population produces only 4.2% of the world’s annual GHG pollution.

Ideally, all countries should have to pay a damage-related Carbon Tax to enable action to mitigate global damage due to climate change. Indeed science-trained, Green Left Pope Francis has declared that the environmental and human cost of pollution should be “fully borne” by the polluters: “The principle of the maximization of profits, frequently isolated from other considerations, reflects a misunderstanding of the very concept of the economy. As long as production is increased, little concern is given to whether it is at the cost of future resources or the health of the environment; as long as the clearing of a forest increases production, no one calculates the losses entailed in the desertification of the land, the harm done to biodiversity, or the increased pollution. In a word, businesses profit by calculating and paying only a fraction of the costs involved. ‘Yet only when the economic and social costs of using up shared environmental resources are recognized with transparency and fully borne by those who incur them, not by other peoples or future generations,’ [Benedict XVI] can those actions be considered ethical. An instrumental way of reasoning, which provides a purely static analysis of realities in the service of present needs, is at work whether resources are allocated by the market or by state central planning” [11, 12].

However, can one realistically see the US (annual GDP $18 trillion) paying an annual Carbon Tax of $8,200 per head or $2.7 trillion annually to meet the cost of the damage caused by profligate US pollution of the one common atmosphere and one common ocean of all nations? Various ways could be considered to make the polluters pay that for the US would range between $2.7 trillion per year (the “fully borne” cost) and $0 (the exceptionalist  Trump position of America polluting as much as it likes and damn everybody else). However one reasonable suggestion between these 2 extremes would be to make nations pay for their pollution above the world average of 8.9 tonnes CO2-equivalent per person per year (Excess Carbon Debt), with nations polluting less than the world average on a per capita basis receiving a compensatory payment (Excess Carbon Credit) that would help them mitigate the damage due to man-made climate change.

Below is the annual per capita Excess Carbon Debt (A-C) or Excess Carbon Credit (D) of the world’s nations in “tonnes CO2-equivalent per person per year after subtracting the world average of 8.9” and this also expressed in “US dollars” with a damage-related Carbon Price of $200 per tonne CO2-equivalent:  

(A) countries with about 4 to 41 times the world average annual per capita GHG pollution:  

Belize (358.0; $71,600 ), Guyana (194.2; $38,840), Malaysia (117.1; $23,420), Papua New Guinea (105.8; $21,460), Qatar (92.9; $18,580), Zambia (88.6; $17,720), Antigua & Barbuda (76.7; $15,340), United Arab Emirates (73.5; $14,700), Panama (59.1; $11,820), Botswana (56.0; $11,200), Liberia (46.1; $9,220), Indonesia (44.7; $8,940), New Zealand (44.3; $8,860), Australia (44.0; $8,800; 107.1 ; $21,420 if including its huge GHG-generating  exports), Nicaragua (42.3; $8,460), Canada (41.2; $8,240), Equatorial Guinea (38.6; $7,720), Venezuela (36.3; $7,260), Brazil (34.5; $6,900),  Myanmar (33.0; $6,600), Ireland (32.5; $7,100), United States (32.1; $6,420), Cambodia (31.6; $6,320), Kuwait (28.4; $5,680), Paraguay (28.3; $5,660), Central African Republic (26.8; $5,360).

(B) countries with about 2 and 4 times the world average annual per capita GHG pollution:

Peru (25.9; $5,180), Mongolia (23.3; $4,660), Singapore (22.3; $4,460), Bahrain (21.6; $4,320), Trinidad & Tobago (20.9; $4,180), Cameroon (20.6; $4,120), Congo, Democratic Republic (formerly Zaire) (20.4; $4,008), Côte d’Ivoire (20.2; $4,040), Denmark (18.9; $3,780), Brunei (18.5; $3,700), Bolivia (18.4; $3,680), Guatemala (18.0; $3,600), Belgium (17.4; $3,480), Ecuador (17.3; $3,460),  Estonia (16.5; $3,300), Laos (16.4; $3,280), Suriname (16.2; $3,240), Netherlands (16.0; $3,200), Libya (16.0; $3,200), Nepal (15.7; $3,140), Benin (15.6; $3,120), Angola (14.9; $2,980), Madagascar (14.8; $2,960), Argentina (14.8; $2,960), Uruguay (14.8; $2,960)*, Luxembourg (14.7; $2,940), Turkmenistan (14.6; $2,920), Czech Republic (14.6; $2,920), Zimbabwe (14.4; $2,880), Gabon (14.2; $2,840), Greece (13.0; $2,600), United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (12.6; $2,520), Cyprus (12.5; $2,500), Congo, Republic (12.1; $2,420), Spain (12.0; $2,400), Finland (11.7; $2,340), Israel (11.3; $2,260), Norway (11.2; $2,240), Colombia (10.9; $2,180), Namibia (10.9; $2,180), Mauritania (10.8; $2,160), South Africa (10.5; $2,100), Ukraine (10.2; $2,040), Germany (9.7; $1,940).

(C) countries with about 1 and 2 times the world average annual per capita GHG pollution:

France (8.8; $1,760), Italy (8.7; $1,740), Uzbekistan (8.6; $1,720), Costa Rica (8.2; $1,640), Sudan (7.9; $1,580), Saudi Arabia (7.7; $1,540), Slovenia (7.6; $1,520), Azerbaijan (7.5; $1,500), Russia (7.3; $1,460), Sierra Leone (7.3; $1,460), Slovakia (7.0; $1,400), Honduras (6.9; $1,380), Hungary (6.6; $1,320), Kazakhstan (6.5; $1,300), Portugal (6.1; $1,220), Sweden (6.1; $1,220), Iran (5.6; $1,120), Iceland (5.3; $1,060), Mexico (5.0; $1,000), Oman (4.9; $980), Malta (4.4; $880), Austria (4.1; $820), Poland (4.0; $800), Jamaica (3.9; $780), Palau (3.9; $780), South Korea (3.8; $760), Guinea (3.6 $720), North Korea (3.2; $640), Bahamas (3.2; $640), Nigeria (2.8; $560), Nauru (2.8; $560), Malawi (2.8; $560), Mali (2.7; $540), Chad (2.7; $540), Taiwan (2.7; $540), Latvia (2.5; $500), Vanuatu (2.2; $440), Switzerland (2.1: $420), Romania (2.0; $400),  Togo (2.0; $400), Japan (1.8; $360), Serbia & Montenegro (1.5; $300), Seychelles (1.3; $260), Bulgaria (1.2; $240), Lebanon (0.9; $180), Syria (0.5; $100), Tanzania (0.4; $80), Turkey (0.3; $60), Barbados 0.2; $40), Jordan (0.2; $40), Occupied State of Palestine (0.2; $40)*, Philippines (0.1; $20), Guinea-Bissau (0.1; $20).

(D) countries with annual per capita GHG pollution at or below world average (8.9 tonnes CO2-equivalent per person per year) and hence having Zero Excess Carbon Debt or Negative Excess Carbon Debt (Excess Carbon Credit):  

Ghana (0; $0), Thailand (-0.2; -$40), Chile (-0.2; -$40), Fiji (- 0.2; -$40), Belarus (-0.3; -$60), Sri Lanka (-0.4; -$80), Macedonia (-0.4; -$80), Tonga (-1.5; -$300), Croatia (-1.5; -$300), China ( -1.5; -$300), Burkina Faso ( -1.6; -$320), Bosnia & Herzegovina (-1.7; -$340), Kenya (-1.8; -$360), Dominican Republic (-1.8; -$360), Senegal (-1.9; -$380), Tunisia (-1.9; -$380), Algeria (-2.3; -$460), Grenada (-2.5; -$500), Samoa (-2.7; -$540), Rwanda (-2.8; -$560), El Salvador (-2.9; -$580), Lithuania (-3.0; -$600), Mozambique (-3.1; -$620), Lesotho (-3.2; -$640), Burundi (-3.4; -$680), Iraq (-3.4; -$680), Eritrea (-3.6; -$720), St Kitts & Nevis (-3.8; -$760), Uganda (-3.8; -$760), Haiti (-3.9; -$780), Mauritius (-3.9; -$780), Albania (-4.6; -$920), Dominica (-4.7; -$940), Bhutan (-4.8; -$960), Niger (-4.8; -$960), Ethiopia (-4.8; -$960), Moldova (-4.9; -$980), Georgia (-4.9; -$980), Yemen (-5.2; -$1,040), Tajikistan (-5.2; -$1,040), Afghanistan (-5.3; -$1,060), Swaziland (-5.3; -$1,060), Cuba (-5.4; -$1,080),   Cape Verde (-5.4; -$1,080), Kyrgyzstan (-5.5; -$1,100), The Gambia (-5.9; -$1,180), St Lucia (-6.0; -$1,200), Bangladesh (-6.2; -$1,240), Egypt (-6.3; -$1,260), Niue (-6.3; -$1,260), Pakistan (-6.4; -$1,280), Morocco (-6.4; -$1,280), Djibouti (-6.5; -$1,300), St Vincent & Grenadines (-6.5; -$1,300), Armenia (-6.6; -$1,320), Maldives (-6.8; -$1,360), India (-6.8; -$1,360), Cook Islands (-6.8; -$1,360), Vietnam (-7.0; -$1,400), São Tomé and Príncipe (-7.0; -$1,400), Comoros (-7.3; -$1,460), Solomon Islands (-7.5; -$1,500), Kiribati (-7.7; -$1,540), Tuvalu (-7.7; -$1,540)* (* indicates an estimate based on that for an immediately contiguous, ethnically-related country).

Conclusions.

Scientifically illiterate, anti-science,   climate change denying and neoliberal war criminal and climate criminal President Trump has vowed to withdraw from the Paris Climate Change Agreement that aimed for less than a 2C temperature rise and an ideal target of no more than plus 1.5C. The Paris Agreement was agreed to by 195 countries (Syria and Nicaragua declined agreement) [13]. It is now widely reported that after his refusal to endorse the Paris Agreement at the recent G7 meeting, Trump will announce US withdrawal from the Paris Climate Change Agreement in coming days [14].

A 1.5C temperature rise will be exceeded in 4-10 years and it is now to late to avoid a catastrophic plus 2C temperature rise [15-17]. Already 7 million people die each year from air pollution [18]. An estimate of a present 0.4 million annual deaths from climate change [19]  may well be a considerable under-estimate because presently 17 million people die avoidably from deprivation in Developing Countries (minus China) that are already impacted by man-made climate change [20]. It is estimated that 10 billion people may die from climate change this century – an average of 100 million such deaths each year this century – if man-made climate change is not requisitely addressed [21]. Nevertheless we are all obliged to do everything we can to make the future “less bad” for future generations [10].

Decent people must act in concert by (a) informing  everyone  they can, (b) insisting like Pope Francis that the cost of pollution is “fully borne” by the polluters via a damage-related Carbon Price,  (c) resolutely promising  that those political and corporate leaders disproportionately complicit in the worsening Climate Genocide will inescapably face dispossession and dire custodial punishment [22], and (d) by urging application of  Boycotts, Divestment  and Sanctions (BDS), Green Tariffs , International Court of Justice (ICJ) litigations and International Criminal Court (ICC) prosecutions  against the worst polluting countries.

References.

[1]. Gideon Polya, “Revised Annual Per Capita Greenhouse Gas Pollution For All Countries – What Is Your Country Doing?”, Countercurrents, 6 January, 2016: http://www.countercurrents.org/polya060116.htm .

[2]. Gideon Polya, “Exposing And Thence Punishing Worst Polluter Nations Via Weighted Annual Per Capita Greenhouse Gas Pollution Scores”, Countercurrents, 19 March, 2016: http://www.countercurrents.org/polya190316.htm .

[3]. “List of countries by population (United Nations)”, Wikipedia:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_population_(United_Nations) .

[4]. US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), “Recent monthly mean CO2 at Mauna Loa”: http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/gmd/ccgg/trends/ .

[5]. 300.org: https://sites.google.com/site/300orgsite/300-org .

[6]. “300.org – return atmosphere CO2 to 300 ppm CO2”: https://sites.google.com/site/300orgsite/300-org—return-atmosphere-co2-to-300-ppm .

[7]. US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), “CO2 at NOAA’s Mauna Loa Observatory reaches new milestone: Tops 400 ppm”, 10 May 2103: http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/gmd/news/7074.html .

[8]. Dr Chris Hope, “How high should climate change taxes be?”, Working Paper Series, Judge Business School, University of Cambridge, 9.2011: http://www.jbs.cam.ac.uk/fileadmin/user_upload/research/workingpapers/wp1109.pdf .

[9]. “Carbon Debt Carbon Credit”: https://sites.google.com/site/carbondebtcarboncredit/ .

[10]. “Climate Justice & Intergenerational Equity”: https://sites.google.com/site/300orgsite/climate-justice .

[11]. Pope Francis , Encyclical Letter “Laudato si”, 2015 (section 195): http://w2.vatican.va/content/francesco/en/encyclicals/documents/papa-francesco_20150524_enciclica-laudato-si.html .

[12]. Gideon Polya, “Pope Francis Demands “Fully Borne” Cost of Pollution (Carbon Price) To Prevent “Millions Of Premature Deaths””, Countercurrents,  29 July, 2015: http://www.countercurrents.org/polya290715.htm .

[13]. “Paris Agreement”, Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paris_Agreement .

[14]. Sabrina Siddiqui, Lauren Gambino and David Smith, “Donald Trump ready to withdraw from Paris climate agreement, reports say”, Guardian, 1 June 2017: https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/may/31/donald-trump-withdraw-paris-climate-change-agreement .

[15]. “Are we doomed?”: https://sites.google.com/site/300orgsite/are-we-doomed .

[16]. “Too late to avoid global warming catastrophe”: https://sites.google.com/site/300orgsite/too-late-to-avoid-global-warming .

[17]. “Nuclear weapons ban , end poverty & reverse climate change”: https://sites.google.com/site/300orgsite/nuclear-weapons-ban .

[18]. “Stop air pollution deaths”: https://sites.google.com/site/300orgsite/stop-air-pollution-deaths .

[19]. DARA, “Climate Vulnerability Monitor. A guide to the cold calculus of a hot planet”, 2012, Executive Summary pp2-3: http://daraint.org/climate-vulnerability-monitor/climate-vulnerability-monitor-2012/ .

[20]. Gideon Polya, “Body Count. Global avoidable mortality since 1950”, that includes a succinct history  of every country and is now available for free perusal on the web: http://globalbodycount.blogspot.com/  .

[21]. “Climate Genocide”: https://sites.google.com/site/climategenocide/ .

[22]. Gideon Polya, “”Humanity must pledge inescapable dispossession and custodial retribution for climate criminals”, Countercurrents, 20 December 2017: http://www.countercurrents.org/2016/12/20/humanity-must-pledge-inescapable-dispossession-and-custodial-retribution-for-climate-criminals/  .

Dr Gideon Polya taught science students at a major Australian university for 4 decades. He published some 130 works in a 5 decade scientific career, most recently a huge pharmacological reference text “Biochemical Targets of Plant Bioactive Compounds” (CRC Press/Taylor & Francis, New York & London , 2003). He has published “Body Count. Global avoidable mortality since 1950” (G.M. Polya, Melbourne, 2007: http://globalbodycount.blogspot.com/ ); see also his contributions “Australian complicity in Iraq mass mortality” in “Lies, Deep Fries & Statistics” (edited by Robyn Williams, ABC Books, Sydney, 2007: http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/ockhamsrazor/australian-complicity-in-iraq-mass-mortality/3369002#transcript) and “Ongoing Palestinian Genocide” in “The Plight of the Palestinians (edited by William Cook, Palgrave Macmillan, London, 2010: http://mwcnews.net/focus/analysis/4047-the-plight-of-the-palestinians.html ). He has published a revised and updated 2008 version of his 1998 book “Jane Austen and the Black Hole of British History” (see: http://janeaustenand.blogspot.com/  ) as biofuel-, globalization- and climate-driven global food price increases threaten a greater famine catastrophe than the man-made famine in British-ruled India that killed 6-7 million Indians in the “forgotten” World War 2 Bengal Famine (see recent BBC broadcast involving Dr Polya, Economics Nobel Laureate Professor Amartya Sen and others: http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/history/social-economic-history/listen-the-bengal-famine  ;  Gideon Polya: https://sites.google.com/site/drgideonpolya/home  ; Gideon Polya Writing: https://sites.google.com/site/gideonpolyawriting/ ; Gideon Polya, Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gideon_Polya ) . When words fail one can say it in pictures – for images of Gideon Polya’s huge paintings for the Planet, Peace, Mother and Child see: http://sites.google.com/site/artforpeaceplanetmotherchild/ and http://www.flickr.com/photos/gideonpolya/ .

One Comment

  1. K SHESHU BABU says:

    As reflected in the article, Trump has neither understanding of the implication of climate change nor he has a ‘ vision’ for future. His non – acceptance of Paris agreement is purely on commercial grounds without any logical explanation of his stance taken on the deliberations